Mercedes-Benz Sprinter Data and Comparison Sheets for Download.

Here you will find by model, data and comparison sheets that you can view or print. Some of these files are large and may take a little time to open.

Custom Van Comparison Site for 2016’s

COMPARISONS

2500 144 Low Roof Cargo comparisons

2500 144 High Roof Cargo Comparisons

2500 170 Cargo comparisons

2500 170 Ext Cargo comparisons

3500 144 High Roof comparisons

3500 170 Cargo comparisons

144 Low Roof Passenger comparisons

144 High Roof Passenger comparisons

170 Passenger comparisons

DATA AND SPEC SHEETS

Cargo Van data and specs

Crew Van data and specs

Passenger Van date and specs

Cab Chassis data and specs

Let me know if I can send you any other info about a Sprinter van. Call Dave at 512-942-6923 or email dave@sprinterguy.com

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4 thoughts on “Mercedes-Benz Sprinter Data and Comparison Sheets for Download.

    • Filipe,

      If you are refering to what used to be called the “Mega Roof” van, those have not been built for the US market in a few years. That was the high roof van with an additional few inches of head room with a fiberglass roof added by the factory.

      Now we just have the regular high roof van that is 9 foot tall, with a 6’4″ inside height.

      Is this what you were thinking or are you looking for a 170 wb Extended body van? I have those as well.

      Let me know what you are looking for so I can see how I can assist you.

      Dave

  1. hello, i am scouting for a 3500 sprinter 170 extended. i am confused about the payload ratings. i see 11K+ gross listed for some and 9.xK gross listed for others. i looked on your website and saw a ‘standard’ and ‘maximum’ gross weight listed.

    1st – has the payload capacity changed over the last few years for a 170/ext/3500?
    2nd – which limit – the ‘standard’ or ‘maximum’ is the one to go with?
    3rd – super single vs dually – any change in payload?
    4th – any other options – suspension/etc i should be looking at for max payload?

    i will be carrying every bit of gear i can fit so it is important to know what the real payload capacity is…

    thanks!

    • Heath,

      Thank you for visiting SprinterGuy.com, I hope you have found my site useful in your search for a Mercedes Benz Van. Different models and suspension options can get a little confusing but it is very important to get right when you make your purchase.

      In just the one ton or 3500 models, there are three body lengths and three GVWR ratings. The GVWR is the weight of the van plus the maximum payload it can carry. So you need to know what the weight of the van is to know for sure what payload you can carry in that particular model.

      There is a chart on one of our handout brochures that shows each model, with the available GVWR ratings, what the base vehicle weight is and what the payload would be for that model. I can email this to you to look over. The chart shows the info for 2016 and older to 2010 when Mercedes Benz started selling Sprinter vans. There will be a slight change in the 2017 model year with the Super Single models. Here is a brief rundown of what the van can carry in payload and tow. I won’t go through the 144″ wheelbase as it is not what you are looking for. What I will cover is the 170″ wheelbase and the 170″ wb extended body.

      The 3500 model can come with dual rear wheels or in 2016 they added the Super Single which has just one wheel and tire on each side in the rear, but they are bigger wheels and tires than what comes on the 2500 model and bigger than the dual wheels and tires. The maximum towing capability is less on the Extended body van compared to the regular 170″ wheelbase. On all 3500 models with the 170″ wheelbase, you can tow a 7500 lb trailer with a 750 lb tongue weight. This is the same for dual rear wheels or the Super Single. When you go to the 170″ wb extended body the maximum towing is 5000 lbs with a 500 lb tongue weight. The difference gets in to weight distribution and the rear overhang on the extended body.

      Now payload, it even is different between the 4 cyl and the V6, the 4 cyl can actually carry a higher payload because the engine weighs less.

      3500 170″ wb with 9,990 GVWR Dual rear wheels has payload of 4081 lbs
      3500 170″ wb with 10,140 GVWR Super Single has payload of 4393 lbs
      3500 170″ wb with 11,030 GVWR Dual rear wheels has payload of 5132 lbs

      3500 170″ wb Extended with 9,990 GVWR Dual rear wheels has a payload of 3917 lbs
      3500 170″ wb Extended with 10,140 GVWR Super Single has payload of 4188 lbs
      3500 170″ wb Extended with 11,030 GVWR Dual rear wheels has a payload of 4968 lbs

      You can still add an option for heavy duty front and rear stabilizers, but that does not change the GVWR, just adds more stability.

      So to answer your questions,
      1. there has been no change in the payload capacity over the past 6 years.
      2. which limit, just depends upon what your needs are. You can go with the “Standard” 9,990 GVWR if you can keep your payload within those specs, or increase to the 11,030 GVWR to get the highest payload available.
      3. the super single carries roughly the same as the dual rear wheel 9,990 GVWR but gives you more floor space inside. The dually has 38 inches between the wheel wells on the load floor, the Super Single gives you 48 inches of space between the wheelwells. Also to compare, the regular 2500 models are 53 inches between the wheelwells..
      4. I would go with a 3500 dual rear wheel with the 11,030 GVWR option and order with the heavy duty stabilizer option to get the maximum in payload and suspension if you are going to need that much payload. If not just go with the 9,990 lb GVWR.

      Now one last thing to through you a curve. The difference between a 3500 dual rear wheel with 9,990 GVWR and the 11,030 GVWR has nothing to do with tires, springs, shocks or anything hardware. It simply is a different computer program that tells the van you may be carrying heaving loads and to be able to handle it with the stability control and other features. Like I said at the beginning, it can be quite confusing and complicated when it comes to the suspensions and payload ratings.

      I hope this helps.
      Dave

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